Dobrogea

Highlights:

 

– If you visualize gorgeous beaches and the unique Danube Delta, you are right on track! Completely underrated, offbeat, and way less touristy than many other Romanian regions, Dobrogea is home to iconic landscapes and scenic cliffs.

– The area has 245 km of coastline and is a land full of history with  the most eye-catching natural wonders.

– The traditional cuisine of Dobrogea, which consists mostly of  fish, is absolutely divine. Remember to taste Suberek, Saramura  de peste, Bors de macrou, Zacusca de peste, Peste cu sos de  rosii, Musacaua and Dobrogeana. Of course don’t forget about  the desserts: Baclava and Sarailii.

Photo by CALIN STAN on Unsplash

Here you can really uncover an offbeat Romanian experience  without all the crazy crowds that the most famous destinations in  Romania hold. We guarantee that you’ll be wondering why you  didn’t travel to Dobrogea earlier.

Did you know that Dobrogea has one of the most diverse  populations in Romania? There are about 18 different cultures in  the region: Romanians, Aromanians (Machidons) Turks, Tatars,  Lipovan Russians, Bulgarians, Armenians, Jews, Greeks,  Ukrainians, Gagauzians, Germans, Italians, Albanians, Serbs,  Hungarians, etc. In Dobrogea, you can find the smallest minority of  Gagauzians (Christian Turks) who live in Vama Veche and Fantana Mare. By the way, Fantana Mare is the only Muslim village from  Romania inhabited entirely by Turks and Tatars.

The reason for this cultural diversification is due to the fact that  throughout history, Dobrogea was under various occupations. The  region was occupied by Dacians, Greeks, Romans and Ottomans.  However, since the 19th century, Dobrogea has remained divided  between the territories of Bulgaria and Romania. In Romania,  Dobrogea is composed of the counties of Tulcea and Constanta,  and in Bulgaria, by the counties of Durostor and Caliacra.

“Why is this region called Dobrogea?” The current name of  Dobrogea comes from the despot Dobrotici, a former Bulgarian  ruler who ruled in the Land of Carvuna (a former territory located  between the northeastern Bulgarian side of Dobrogea and the  Romanian one, not including the Danube Delta).

“When did Dobrogea become part of Romania?” The entire  region of Dobrogea became part of Romania on December 14,  1878, after the Russo-Turkish war. However, in 1916, Dobrogea  returned to Bulgaria following the lost battle at Turtucaia. After only  2 years, in 1918, Romania regained Dobrogea thanks to its  victorious battles at Marasti, Marasesti and Oituz. During WW2,  following the treaty that took place between Hitler and Charler II,  Romania lost the southern part of Dobrogea. The counties of  Caliacra and Durostor became part of Bulgaria.

“Is it Dobruja or Dobrogea?” It actually depends on the region. In  Romania we called it “Dobrogea”, but in other countries, such as  Bulgaria, they called it “Dobruja”. However, the region was known  in the past as Dacia Pontica or Scythia Minor. 

P.S.: If you are fascinated about history, legends and local stories,  you cannot miss Dobrogea. You will be surprised how much there  is to discover and to explore. Pin the following ancient cities to  your list: Histria, Enisala, Tropaeum Traiani, Halmyris, Capidava,  Argamum, Dinogetia, old Tomis, Ibida, Carsium, Troesmis, and  Noviodunum.

Aren’t stories interesting? Each region has its own legends and  stories, and Dobrogea makes no exception. The first one is  regarding the great ancient poet called Ovid/Ovidius. Publius  Ovidius Naso was born in the Italian peninsula in 43 b.C.. In the  year 8 a.C., he was exiled to the city of Tomis (which is, nowadays,  the city of Constanta), and lived there until the year of his death (17  b.C.). He wrote poems of great value, including Amores,  Metamorphoses, Fastele, Triste, etc.. Today, in Constanta we find a  statue of Ovidius, right in the center of the old town, and several  places and institutions in Dobrogea bear his name. 

Another captivating story revolves around the Apostle Andrew.  According to the legends, the Apostle Andrew came to the region  of Dobrogea around the 1st century b.C., not alone but escorted by  “Marele Lup Alb”, the Big White Wolf. He preached the Gospel,  reinforced by the presence of this great Dacian symbol, and gained  the trust of the local populations. Nowadays, the Apostle Andrew is  considered to be the apostle of Romanians and he is honored in  many places of Dobrogea and Romania.

Top landmarks to visit in Dobrogea:

 1. Constanta. The largest city of Dobrogea is Constanta. The city  was founded in the 7th century BC. by Greek settlers under the  name of Tomis. In 71 b.C. Tomis was conquered by Romans who  changed its name to Constantiana, after the name of Constantin  the Great’s sister. After the fall of the Roman Empire, the city has  never been the same again. Until the end of the 19th century,  Constanta was just a small shopping center on the Black Sea.  Anghel Saligny, a famous Romanian engineer, changed the course  of Constanta’s history when he achieved the first connection  between Dobrogea and Romania through the construction of the  Cernavoda bridge. Nowadays, under the Romanian administration, Constanta has become one of the most significant ports on the  Black Sea.

2. The second largest city of Dobrogea is Tulcea. The city is  located on seven hills, and was founded by the Greeks in the 7th  century b.C. who named it “Aegyssus”. In present times, Tulcea  has beautiful ruins of the past and it represents the gate to the  amazing Danube Delta.

3. If you love wine, you should definitely visit Murfatlar. With its  famous vineyard, and the oldest church in the Basarabi – Murfatlar  cave complex, the city is a must see of the region.

4. Other important sites in Dobrogea are the cities of MedgidiaBabadag and Sulina.

5. During the summer season (May-October), don’t miss these iconic landmarks: the city of Mamaia, which is the main resort of the Romanian seaside area; Costinesti, the young people’s  preferred city; Eforie Sud, known for its mud treatment from Techerghiol lake; Vama Veche, the place of hipsters and all-night parties; Mangalia, a port city with beautiful beaches; OlympusNeptune; Jupiter, Cap Aurora, Venus and Saturn. They are all on  the coastline between Mamaia and Bulgaria, thus making it easy to  check them all in a one-day trip.

Best Festivals in Dobrogea:

From traditional ones to the most contemporary, Dobrogea is a  wonderful festival destination and there will always be something to  keep you entertained.

1. International Independent Film Festival – ANONIMUL. The  International Independent Film Festival ANONIMUL was  launched by the ANONIMUL Foundation, with the intent of  creating a different film festival reserved for young directors and  independent films. It takes place every year in August, in the city of Sfântu Gheorghe, near the Danube Delta area. Don’t miss  out!

2. NEVERSEA Festival. Neversea Festival is a music festival of  diverse genres of music that takes place on the Neversea  beach, in the city of Constanta. It takes place in July and it lasts  for 3 days. Come with your friends and enjoy an unforgettable  summer!

3. Dobroge Festival – Viata de Folclor. Dobroge Festival – Life of  Folklore is a beautiful festival that takes place in Constanta, and  it is dedicated to folklore music. Participating to this festival will  make you fall in love with the traditional Romanian culture and Music.

4. “Jurilovca Lipovan Borscht Festival” is the biggest  gastronomic festival of the Danube Delta area. It takes place in  the autumn and revolves around the Romanian juice called  Bors. The “bors” in Dobrogea has a very special taste, different  compared to other parts of Romania. The richness of taste is  due to the fact that the area is full of fresh fish, and the dishes  are cooked by very devoted housewives who put a lot of soul  into what they cook.

5. “Mahmudia Diversity Festival” is another festival that takes  place in the Danube Delta area. It’s a very recent festivity where  you can go on tours to visit the sights of the Mahmudia village,  enjoy tasty culinary shows, dance performances and listen to  old folklore music.

With about 18 different ethnicities, in Dobrogea you will find many  amazing traditions and festivities that happen throughout the year.  Dobrogean customs are similar to those practiced in other parts of  Romania. They always reflect the relationship between humanity  and nature, or the connection with the divine. Here are the most  famous ones:

1. Dragobetele”, also called “Navalnicul” or “Logodnicul  Pasarilor”, Dragobetele is a Romanian kind of Valentine’s Day. It is  celebrated in February, between the 24th and the 28th. During  these days, lovers must kiss daily, wash their hair and face with  snow, men must chase women in a wild run, women must clean  their houses, and people who like each other must go on a date.  Moreover, no one is allowed to be sad!

2. Cucii” is a festivity celebrated on the first day after Easter. The  custom consists of a parade of masks. Cucii wear different masks,  long skirts and traditional shoes (opinci) with bells, and they go  throughout the village, to cast away the evil spirits.

3. Dragaica” or “Sanzienele” is a traditional Romanian holiday  celebrated on June 24. On this day, the ladies pick up flowers and  make wreaths that they put on the gates or at the windows to  attract good luck and abundance. This is then combined with  another tradition that consists of throwing the wreath on the roof of  the house. If the wreath doesn’t fall, the lady will be getting married  in that precise year.

4. Olaria” or “Hurhumbalul” is a vivid festivity which consists of burning feed. This practice is considered to be a measure of  cleaning and an opportunity for new vegetation to grow stronger.  Olaria is practiced one week before Easter.

Rural Life

Currently, Dobrogea area is inhabited by Romanians, Aromanians,  Turks, Tatars, Lipovan Russians, Greeks, Bulgarians and  Ukrainians. Each community has kept its specific traditions in  terms of holidays, architecture and customs. It’s really fascinating  to observe the differences between these populations.

Dobrogea villages are charming in their simplicity. The houses  rarely have more than one floor, they are built of adobe (a mixture  of clay, straw and horse manure), and many of them are covered  with reeds (especially in the Danube Delta area). 

The Aromanians use a lot of wool in their houses, which comes  from their main occupation of shepherding. The Turks and Tartars  have rooms in which the canopy sits above the bed, and in the  eastern side of the house you can always find a hookah and a  Turkish kettle.

The villages of the Lipovan Russians are quite a few. Most of them  are located in the Danube Delta and in the northern part of Tulcea  County. Inside their houses, you will see a lot of blue, the bed is  always covered with a beautifully woven blanket and the walls are  covered with brightly colored carpets.

The architecture of the Romanian villages is lively and cheerful.  Inside their houses you can notice traditional towels and blankets  that cover the furniture, and a lot of red, green and blue colors. Go  spot these interesting houses and their hidden gems!

19 Must see special tourist attractions in Dobrogea

The easternmost historical province of Romania stores a whole  treasure of interesting destinations. Dobrogea is a great mix of the  best sights, restaurants, and museums where mostly locals flock  to, which makes you feel it’s not so touristy. Pin these important  touristic attractions to your list:

1. The Danube Delta;
2. Dervent Monastery;
3. St. Andrew the Apostle Cave Monastery;
4. Macin Mountains;
5. Sinoe Lake;
6. Capul Dolosman;
7. Casian Cave;
8. Bat Cave;
9. Lake Iacobdeal;
10. Sphinx of Dobrogea;
11. Vadu and Corbu wild beaches;
12. Tuzla Beach;
13. “Evanghelia“ Wreck at Costinesti;
14. Cheile Dobrogei (Keys of Dobrogea);
15. Pacaiul lui Soare;
16. The chalk churches from Dobrogea;
17. Poarta Vanturilor;
18. La Adam cave;
19. Babadag forest;

It’s a pity that many skip Dobrogea when traveling to Romania.  There are many great sights in Dobrogea, and truthfully, a month  would not be enough to take in all that it has to offer. Dobrogea is a wonderful place to explore in any season.

Visit it in the summer, and you will find the most beautiful beaches  from Eastern Europe. Visit it in the spring, and it will be all about the  hikes and the archeological sites. Go in the fall and winter months,  and you will have so many festivals to choose from and delicious  traditional food to gorge on.

Dobrogea is famous for its beaches, so don’t miss them! In the  summertime, you can spend hours basking in the sun, relaxing and  swimming in the clear Black Sea waters.

Located in the southeastern part of Romania, the historical  province of Dobrogea is a very unique extra-Carpathian region in  Europe, known for its extremely diverse and rich natural heritage.

You will have plenty of chances to get close to nature in Dobrogea.  Make sure to have a go-pro at hand as you will want to take lots of  photos!

The area includes four morphostructural units: the Danube Delta,  the northern Dobrogea horst, the Casimce plateau and the  Sarmatic plateau of southern Dobrogea.

When it comes to natural drama, there’s nowhere in Romania that delivers like Dobrogea.

The diversity of the existing geomorphological, pedo-climatic,  hydrological and edaphic conditions determined the development  of a distinct mix of Euro-Asian, Pontic-Balkan and Mediterranean  floristic and faunal elements.

Among the over 6,000 species of plants and animals identified in  the area, there are also species that are subject to protection and  conservation measures applied at a national and international level.  In order to protect these species, 33 protected natural areas are  declared in the territory of North Dobrogea, among which: the  Macin National Park, the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve,  Niculitel Forest, Babadag Codru Forest, Korum Tarla Botanical  Reserve, etc. To these, two more geological reservations can be  added, currently declared natural monuments: Dealul Bujoarelor  Fossil Point and Dealul Pietros Fossil Point.

But there is more!

Dobrogea coast offers real sources of exceptionally healthy value:

  1. Sapropelic mud (unique in the world, with special healing  qualities);
  2. Salt water of Lake Techirghiol,
  3. Marine climate with stimulating action;
  4. Natural aerosols;
  5. Numerous mesothermal sulfurous springs.

No matter where you will be accommodated, Dobrogea will  surprise you with incredible sunsets. It is also a fantastic  destination for gourmets, as there are lots of excellent restaurants.  Curious to discover all there is to see and do in Dobrogea? Book a  trip now!

SOMETHING OLD

Did you know that Dobrogea has one of the most diverse  populations in Romania? There are about 18 different cultures in  the region: Romanians, Aromanians (Machidons) Turks, Tatars,  Lipovan Russians, Bulgarians, Armenians, Jews, Greeks,  Ukrainians, Gagauzians, Germans, Italians, Albanians, Serbs,  Hungarians, etc. In Dobrogea, you can find the smallest minority of  Gagauzians (Christian Turks) who live in Vama Veche and Fantana Mare. By the way, Fantana Mare is the only Muslim village from  Romania inhabited entirely by Turks and Tatars.

The reason for this cultural diversification is due to the fact that  throughout history, Dobrogea was under various occupations. The  region was occupied by Dacians, Greeks, Romans and Ottomans.  However, since the 19th century, Dobrogea has remained divided  between the territories of Bulgaria and Romania. In Romania,  Dobrogea is composed of the counties of Tulcea and Constanta,  and in Bulgaria, by the counties of Durostor and Caliacra.

“Why is this region called Dobrogea?” The current name of  Dobrogea comes from the despot Dobrotici, a former Bulgarian  ruler who ruled in the Land of Carvuna (a former territory located  between the northeastern Bulgarian side of Dobrogea and the  Romanian one, not including the Danube Delta).

“When did Dobrogea become part of Romania?” The entire  region of Dobrogea became part of Romania on December 14,  1878, after the Russo-Turkish war. However, in 1916, Dobrogea  returned to Bulgaria following the lost battle at Turtucaia. After only  2 years, in 1918, Romania regained Dobrogea thanks to its  victorious battles at Marasti, Marasesti and Oituz. During WW2,  following the treaty that took place between Hitler and Charler II,  Romania lost the southern part of Dobrogea. The counties of  Caliacra and Durostor became part of Bulgaria.

“Is it Dobruja or Dobrogea?” It actually depends on the region. In  Romania we called it “Dobrogea”, but in other countries, such as  Bulgaria, they called it “Dobruja”. However, the region was known  in the past as Dacia Pontica or Scythia Minor. 

P.S.: If you are fascinated about history, legends and local stories,  you cannot miss Dobrogea. You will be surprised how much there  is to discover and to explore. Pin the following ancient cities to  your list: Histria, Enisala, Tropaeum Traiani, Halmyris, Capidava,  Argamum, Dinogetia, old Tomis, Ibida, Carsium, Troesmis, and  Noviodunum.

Aren’t stories interesting? Each region has its own legends and  stories, and Dobrogea makes no exception. The first one is  regarding the great ancient poet called Ovid/Ovidius. Publius  Ovidius Naso was born in the Italian peninsula in 43 b.C.. In the  year 8 a.C., he was exiled to the city of Tomis (which is, nowadays,  the city of Constanta), and lived there until the year of his death (17  b.C.). He wrote poems of great value, including Amores,  Metamorphoses, Fastele, Triste, etc.. Today, in Constanta we find a  statue of Ovidius, right in the center of the old town, and several  places and institutions in Dobrogea bear his name. 

Another captivating story revolves around the Apostle Andrew.  According to the legends, the Apostle Andrew came to the region  of Dobrogea around the 1st century b.C., not alone but escorted by  “Marele Lup Alb”, the Big White Wolf. He preached the Gospel,  reinforced by the presence of this great Dacian symbol, and gained  the trust of the local populations. Nowadays, the Apostle Andrew is  considered to be the apostle of Romanians and he is honored in  many places of Dobrogea and Romania.

SOMETHING NEW

Top landmarks to visit in Dobrogea:

 1. Constanta. The largest city of Dobrogea is Constanta. The city  was founded in the 7th century BC. by Greek settlers under the  name of Tomis. In 71 b.C. Tomis was conquered by Romans who  changed its name to Constantiana, after the name of Constantin  the Great’s sister. After the fall of the Roman Empire, the city has  never been the same again. Until the end of the 19th century,  Constanta was just a small shopping center on the Black Sea.  Anghel Saligny, a famous Romanian engineer, changed the course  of Constanta’s history when he achieved the first connection  between Dobrogea and Romania through the construction of the  Cernavoda bridge. Nowadays, under the Romanian administration, Constanta has become one of the most significant ports on the  Black Sea.

2. The second largest city of Dobrogea is Tulcea. The city is  located on seven hills, and was founded by the Greeks in the 7th  century b.C. who named it “Aegyssus”. In present times, Tulcea  has beautiful ruins of the past and it represents the gate to the  amazing Danube Delta.

3. If you love wine, you should definitely visit Murfatlar. With its  famous vineyard, and the oldest church in the Basarabi – Murfatlar  cave complex, the city is a must see of the region.

4. Other important sites in Dobrogea are the cities of MedgidiaBabadag and Sulina.

5. During the summer season (May-October), don’t miss these iconic landmarks: the city of Mamaia, which is the main resort of the Romanian seaside area; Costinesti, the young people’s  preferred city; Eforie Sud, known for its mud treatment from Techerghiol lake; Vama Veche, the place of hipsters and all-night parties; Mangalia, a port city with beautiful beaches; OlympusNeptune; Jupiter, Cap Aurora, Venus and Saturn. They are all on  the coastline between Mamaia and Bulgaria, thus making it easy to  check them all in a one-day trip.

Best Festivals in Dobrogea:

From traditional ones to the most contemporary, Dobrogea is a  wonderful festival destination and there will always be something to  keep you entertained.

1. International Independent Film Festival – ANONIMUL. The  International Independent Film Festival ANONIMUL was  launched by the ANONIMUL Foundation, with the intent of  creating a different film festival reserved for young directors and  independent films. It takes place every year in August, in the city of Sfântu Gheorghe, near the Danube Delta area. Don’t miss  out!

2. NEVERSEA Festival. Neversea Festival is a music festival of  diverse genres of music that takes place on the Neversea  beach, in the city of Constanta. It takes place in July and it lasts  for 3 days. Come with your friends and enjoy an unforgettable  summer!

3. Dobroge Festival – Viata de Folclor. Dobroge Festival – Life of  Folklore is a beautiful festival that takes place in Constanta, and  it is dedicated to folklore music. Participating to this festival will  make you fall in love with the traditional Romanian culture and Music.

4. “Jurilovca Lipovan Borscht Festival” is the biggest  gastronomic festival of the Danube Delta area. It takes place in  the autumn and revolves around the Romanian juice called  Bors. The “bors” in Dobrogea has a very special taste, different  compared to other parts of Romania. The richness of taste is  due to the fact that the area is full of fresh fish, and the dishes  are cooked by very devoted housewives who put a lot of soul  into what they cook.

5. “Mahmudia Diversity Festival” is another festival that takes  place in the Danube Delta area. It’s a very recent festivity where  you can go on tours to visit the sights of the Mahmudia village,  enjoy tasty culinary shows, dance performances and listen to  old folklore music.

SOMETHING SPECIAL

With about 18 different ethnicities, in Dobrogea you will find many  amazing traditions and festivities that happen throughout the year.  Dobrogean customs are similar to those practiced in other parts of  Romania. They always reflect the relationship between humanity  and nature, or the connection with the divine. Here are the most  famous ones:

1. Dragobetele”, also called “Navalnicul” or “Logodnicul  Pasarilor”, Dragobetele is a Romanian kind of Valentine’s Day. It is  celebrated in February, between the 24th and the 28th. During  these days, lovers must kiss daily, wash their hair and face with  snow, men must chase women in a wild run, women must clean  their houses, and people who like each other must go on a date.  Moreover, no one is allowed to be sad!

2. Cucii” is a festivity celebrated on the first day after Easter. The  custom consists of a parade of masks. Cucii wear different masks,  long skirts and traditional shoes (opinci) with bells, and they go  throughout the village, to cast away the evil spirits.

3. Dragaica” or “Sanzienele” is a traditional Romanian holiday  celebrated on June 24. On this day, the ladies pick up flowers and  make wreaths that they put on the gates or at the windows to  attract good luck and abundance. This is then combined with  another tradition that consists of throwing the wreath on the roof of  the house. If the wreath doesn’t fall, the lady will be getting married  in that precise year.

4. Olaria” or “Hurhumbalul” is a vivid festivity which consists of burning feed. This practice is considered to be a measure of  cleaning and an opportunity for new vegetation to grow stronger.  Olaria is practiced one week before Easter.

Rural Life

Currently, Dobrogea area is inhabited by Romanians, Aromanians,  Turks, Tatars, Lipovan Russians, Greeks, Bulgarians and  Ukrainians. Each community has kept its specific traditions in  terms of holidays, architecture and customs. It’s really fascinating  to observe the differences between these populations.

Dobrogea villages are charming in their simplicity. The houses  rarely have more than one floor, they are built of adobe (a mixture  of clay, straw and horse manure), and many of them are covered  with reeds (especially in the Danube Delta area). 

The Aromanians use a lot of wool in their houses, which comes  from their main occupation of shepherding. The Turks and Tartars  have rooms in which the canopy sits above the bed, and in the  eastern side of the house you can always find a hookah and a  Turkish kettle.

The villages of the Lipovan Russians are quite a few. Most of them  are located in the Danube Delta and in the northern part of Tulcea  County. Inside their houses, you will see a lot of blue, the bed is  always covered with a beautifully woven blanket and the walls are  covered with brightly colored carpets.

The architecture of the Romanian villages is lively and cheerful.  Inside their houses you can notice traditional towels and blankets  that cover the furniture, and a lot of red, green and blue colors. Go  spot these interesting houses and their hidden gems!

19 Must see special tourist attractions in Dobrogea

The easternmost historical province of Romania stores a whole  treasure of interesting destinations. Dobrogea is a great mix of the  best sights, restaurants, and museums where mostly locals flock  to, which makes you feel it’s not so touristy. Pin these important  touristic attractions to your list:

1. The Danube Delta;
2. Dervent Monastery;
3. St. Andrew the Apostle Cave Monastery;
4. Macin Mountains;
5. Sinoe Lake;
6. Capul Dolosman;
7. Casian Cave;
8. Bat Cave;
9. Lake Iacobdeal;
10. Sphinx of Dobrogea;
11. Vadu and Corbu wild beaches;
12. Tuzla Beach;
13. “Evanghelia“ Wreck at Costinesti;
14. Cheile Dobrogei (Keys of Dobrogea);
15. Pacaiul lui Soare;
16. The chalk churches from Dobrogea;
17. Poarta Vanturilor;
18. La Adam cave;
19. Babadag forest;

SOMETHING GREEN

It’s a pity that many skip Dobrogea when traveling to Romania.  There are many great sights in Dobrogea, and truthfully, a month  would not be enough to take in all that it has to offer. Dobrogea is a wonderful place to explore in any season.

Visit it in the summer, and you will find the most beautiful beaches  from Eastern Europe. Visit it in the spring, and it will be all about the  hikes and the archeological sites. Go in the fall and winter months,  and you will have so many festivals to choose from and delicious  traditional food to gorge on.

Dobrogea is famous for its beaches, so don’t miss them! In the  summertime, you can spend hours basking in the sun, relaxing and  swimming in the clear Black Sea waters.

Located in the southeastern part of Romania, the historical  province of Dobrogea is a very unique extra-Carpathian region in  Europe, known for its extremely diverse and rich natural heritage.

You will have plenty of chances to get close to nature in Dobrogea.  Make sure to have a go-pro at hand as you will want to take lots of  photos!

The area includes four morphostructural units: the Danube Delta,  the northern Dobrogea horst, the Casimce plateau and the  Sarmatic plateau of southern Dobrogea.

When it comes to natural drama, there’s nowhere in Romania that delivers like Dobrogea.

The diversity of the existing geomorphological, pedo-climatic,  hydrological and edaphic conditions determined the development  of a distinct mix of Euro-Asian, Pontic-Balkan and Mediterranean  floristic and faunal elements.

Among the over 6,000 species of plants and animals identified in  the area, there are also species that are subject to protection and  conservation measures applied at a national and international level.  In order to protect these species, 33 protected natural areas are  declared in the territory of North Dobrogea, among which: the  Macin National Park, the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve,  Niculitel Forest, Babadag Codru Forest, Korum Tarla Botanical  Reserve, etc. To these, two more geological reservations can be  added, currently declared natural monuments: Dealul Bujoarelor  Fossil Point and Dealul Pietros Fossil Point.

But there is more!

Dobrogea coast offers real sources of exceptionally healthy value:

  1. Sapropelic mud (unique in the world, with special healing  qualities);
  2. Salt water of Lake Techirghiol,
  3. Marine climate with stimulating action;
  4. Natural aerosols;
  5. Numerous mesothermal sulfurous springs.

No matter where you will be accommodated, Dobrogea will  surprise you with incredible sunsets. It is also a fantastic  destination for gourmets, as there are lots of excellent restaurants.  Curious to discover all there is to see and do in Dobrogea? Book a  trip now!

Favourite experiences in Dobrogea

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